YODA MAP3K kinase regulates plant immune responses conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance

Other publications from Group members
Sopeña-Torres S., Jordá L., Sánchez-Rodríguez C., Miedes E., Escudero V., Swami S., López G., Piślewska-Bednarek M., Lassowskat I., Lee J., Gu Y., Haigis S., Alexander D., Pattathil S., Muñoz-Barrios A., Bednarek P., Somerville S., Schulze-Lefert P., Hahn M.G., Scheel D., Molina A.
New Phytol. 2018 Apr;218(2):661-680. doi: 10.1111/nph.15007. Epub 2018 Feb 16.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) cascades play essential roles in plants by transducing developmental cues and environmental signals into cellular responses. Among the latter are microbe-associated molecular patterns perceived by pattern recognition receptors (PRRs), which trigger immunity. We found that YODA (YDA) – a MAPK kinase kinase regulating several Arabidopsis developmental processes, like stomatal patterning – also modulates immune responses. Resistance to pathogens is compromised in yda alleles, whereas plants expressing the constitutively active YDA (CA-YDA) protein show broad-spectrum resistance to fungi, bacteria, and oomycetes with different colonization modes. YDA functions in the same pathway as ERECTA (ER) Receptor-Like Kinase, regulating both immunity and stomatal patterning. ER-YDA-mediated immune responses act in parallel to canonical disease resistance pathways regulated by phytohormones and PRRs. CA-YDA plants exhibit altered cell-wall integrity and constitutively express defense-associated genes, including some encoding putative small secreted peptides and PRRs whose impairment resulted in enhanced susceptibility phenotypes. CA-YDA plants show strong reprogramming of their phosphoproteome, which contains protein targets distinct from described MAPKs substrates. Our results suggest that, in addition to stomata development, the ER-YDA pathway regulates an immune surveillance system conferring broad-spectrum disease resistance that is distinct from the canonical pathways mediated by described PRRs and defense hormones.

 

Keywords: ERECTA, cell wall, mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), pattern recognition receptor (PRR), plant immunity, receptor-like kinase (RLK), stomata

The impact of different agroecological conditions on the nutritional composition of quinoa seeds

Other publications from Group members
Reguera M., Conesa C.M., Gil-Gómez A., Haros C.M., Pérez-Casas M.Á., Briones-Labarca V., Bolaños L., Bonilla I., Álvarez R., Pinto K., Mujica Á., Bascuñán-Godoy L.
PeerJ. 2018 Mar 14;6:e4442. doi: 10.7717/peerj.4442. eCollection 2018.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Quinoa cultivation has been expanded around the world in the last decade and is considered an exceptional crop with the potential of contributing to food security worldwide. The exceptional nutritional value of quinoa seeds relies on their high protein content, their amino acid profile that includes a good balance of essential amino acids, the mineral composition and the presence of antioxidants and other important nutrients such as fiber or vitamins. Although several studies have pointed to the influence of different environmental stresses in certain nutritional components little attention has been paid to the effect of the agroecological context on the nutritional properties of the seeds what may strongly impact on the consumer food’s quality. Thus, aiming to evaluate the effect of the agroecological conditions on the nutritional profile of quinoa seeds we analyzed three quinoa cultivars (Salcedo-INIA, Titicaca and Regalona) at different locations (Spain, Peru and Chile). The results revealed that several nutritional parameters such as the amino acid profile, the protein content, the mineral composition and the phytate amount in the seeds depend on the location and cultivar while other parameters such as saponin or fiber were more stable across locations. Our results support the notion that nutritional characteristics of seeds may be determined by seed’s origin and further analysis are needed to define the exact mechanisms that control the changes in the seeds nutritional properties.

 

Keywords: Agroecological conditions, nutritional properties, Quinoa, seed

MtMTP2-facilitated zinc transport into intracellular compartments is essential for nodule development in Medicago truncatula

Journal paper
León-Mediavilla P., Senovilla M., Montiel J., Gil-Diez P., Saez A., Kryvoruchko I.S., Reguera M., Udvardi M.K., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
Front. Plant Sci. doi 10.3389/fpls.2018.00990
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Zinc (Zn) is an essential nutrient for plants that is involved in almost every biological process. This includes symbiotic nitrogen fixation, a process carried out by endosymbiotic bacteria (rhizobia) living within differentiated plant cells of legume root nodules. Zn transport in nodules involves delivery from the root, via the vasculature, release into the apoplast and uptake into nodule cells. Once in the cytosol, Zn can be used directly by cytosolic proteins or delivered into organelles, including symbiosomes of infected cells, by zinc efflux transporters. Medicago truncatula MtMTP2 (Medtr4g064893) is a nodule-induced Zn-efflux protein that was localized to an intracellular compartment in root epidermal and endodermal cells, as well as in nodule cells. Although the MtMTP2 gene is expressed in roots, shoots, and nodules, mtp2 mutants exhibited growth defects only under symbiotic, nitrogen-fixing conditions. Loss of MtMTP2 function resulted in altered nodule development, defects in bacteroid differentiation, and severe reduction of nitrogenase activity. The results presented here support a role of MtMTP2 in intracellular compartmentation of Zn, which is required for effective symbiotic nitrogen fixation in M. truncatula.

 

Keywords: Zinc, Cation diffusion facilitator, Metal transport protein, symbiotic nitrogen fixation, metal nutrition, nodulation

MtMOT1.2 is responsible for molybdate supply to Medicago truncatula nodules

Journal paper
Gil-Díez P., Tejada-Jiménez M., León-Mediavilla J., Wen J., Mysore K.S., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
Plant Cell Environ. 2018 Jun 25. doi: 10.1111/pce.13388.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legume root nodules requires a steady supply of molybdenum for synthesis of the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase. This nutrient has to be provided by the host plant from the soil, crossing several symplastically disconnected compartments through molybdate transporters, including members of the MOT1 family.

MtMOT1.2 is a Medicago truncatula MOT1 family member located in the endodermal cells in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization of a tagged MtMOT1.2 indicates that it is associated to the plasma membrane and to intracellular membrane systems, where it would be transporting molybdate towards the cytosol, as indicated in yeast transport assays. A loss-of-function mot1.2-1 mutant showed reduced growth compared to wild-type plants when nitrogen fixation was required, but not when nitrogen was provided as nitrate. While no effect on molybdenum-dependent nitrate reductase activity was observed, nitrogenase activity was severely affected, explaining the observed difference of growth depending on nitrogen source. This phenotype was the result of molybdate not reaching the nitrogen-fixing nodules, since genetic complementation with a wild-type MtMOT1.2 gene or molybdate-fortification of the nutrient solution, both restored wild-type levels of growth and nitrogenase activity. These results support a model in which MtMOT1.2 would mediate molybdate delivery by the vasculature into the nodules.

 

Keywords: legume; plant nutrition; rhizobia; symbiotic nitrogen fixation

Please note that you still may get the preprinted document at BioRxiv.

Medicago truncatula copper transporter 1 (MtCOPT1) delivers copper for symbiotic nitrogen fixation

Journal paper
Senovilla M., Castro-Rodríguez R., Abreu I., Escudero V., S Kryvoruchko I., Udvardi M.K., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
New Phytol. 2018 Apr;218(2):696-709. doi: 10.1111/nph.14992. Epub 2018 Jan 19.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Copper is an essential nutrient for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. This element is delivered by the host plant to the nodule, where membrane copper transporter would introduce it into the cell to synthesize cuproproteins.

COPT family members in model legume Medicago truncatula were identified and their expression determined. Yeast complementation assays, confocal microscopy, and phenotypical characterization of a Tnt1 insertional mutant line were carried out in the nodule-specific M. truncatula COPT family member.

Medicago truncatula genome encodes eight COPT transporters. MtCOPT1 (Medtr4g019870) is the only nodule-specific COPT gene. It is located in the plasma membrane of the differentiation, interzone and early fixation zones. Loss of MtCOPT1 function results in a copper-mitigated reduction of biomass production when the plant obtains its nitrogen exclusively from symbiotic nitrogen fixation. Mutation of MtCOPT1 results in diminished nitrogenase activity in nodules, likely an indirect effect from the loss of a copper-dependent function, such as cytochrome oxidase activity in copt1-1 bacteroids.

These data are consistent with a model in which MtCOPT1 transports copper from the apoplast into nodule cells to provide copper for essential metabolic processes associated with symbiotic nitrogen fixation.

 

Keywords: copper transport, cytochrome oxidase, medicago truncatula, nitrogenase, symbiotic nitrogen fixation

Please note that you still may get the preprinted document at BioRxiv.

Identification of Rapeseed (Brassica napus) Cultivars with a High Tolerance to Boron Deficient Conditions

Other publications from Group members
Pommerrenig B., Junker A., Abreu I., Bieber A., Fuge J., Willner E., Bienert M.D., Altmann T., Bienert G.P.
Front. Plant Sci. | doi: 10.3389/fpls.2018.01142
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Boron (B) is an essential micronutrient for seed plants. Information on B-efficiency mechanisms and B-efficient crop and model plant genotypes is very scarce. Studies evaluating the basis and consequences of B-deficiency and B-efficiency are limited by the facts that B occurs as a trace contaminant essentially everywhere, its bioavailability is difficult to control and soil-based B-deficiency growth systems allowing a high-throughput screening of plant populations have hitherto been lacking. The crop plant Brassica napus shows a very high sensitivity towards B-deficient conditions. To reduce B-deficiency-caused yield losses in a sustainable manner, the identification of B-efficient B. napus genotypes is indispensable. We developed a soil substrate-based cultivation system which is suitable to study plant growth in automated high-throughput phenotyping facilities under defined and repeatable soil B conditions. In a comprehensive screening, using this system with soil B concentrations below 0.1 mg B (kg soil)-1, we identified three highly B-deficiency tolerant B. napus cultivars (CR2267, CR2280 and CR2285) amongst a genetically diverse collection comprising 590 accessions from all over the world. The B-efficiency classification of cultivars was based on a detailed assessment of various physical and high-throughput imaging-based shoot and root growth parameters in soil substrate or in in vitro conditions, respectively. We identified cultivar-specific patterns of B-deficiency-responsive growth dynamics. Elemental analysis revealed striking differences only in B contents between contrasting genotypes when grown under B-deficient but not under standard conditions. Results indicate that B-deficiency tolerant cultivars can grow with a very limited amount of B which is clearly below previously described critical B-tissue concentration values. These results suggest a higher B utilization efficiency of CR2267, CR2280 and CR2285 which would represent a unique trait amongst so far identified B-efficient B. napus cultivars which are characterized by a higher B-uptake capacity. Testing various other nutrient deficiency treatments, we demonstrated that the tolerance is specific for B-deficient conditions and is not conferred by a general growth vigor at the seedling stage. The identified B-deficiency tolerant cultivars will serve as genetic and physiological ‘tools’ to further understand the mechanisms regulating the B nutritional status in rapeseed and to develop B-efficient elite genotypes.

 

Keywords: Boron, rapeseed, Brassica napus, phenotyping, boron deficiency tolerance, Boron efficiency, Plant Nutrition

Genomic Diversity in the Endosymbiotic Bacterium Rhizobium leguminosarum

Journal paper
Sánchez-Cañizares C., Jorrín B., Durán D., Nadendla S., Albareda M., Rubio-Sanz L., Lanza M., González-Guerrero M., Prieto R.I., Brito B., Giglio M.G., Rey L., Ruiz-Argüeso T., Palacios J.M., Imperial J.
Genes (Basel). 2018 Jan 24;9(2). pii: E60. doi: 10.3390/genes9020060.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae is a soil α-proteobacterium that establishes a diazotrophic symbiosis with different legumes of the Fabeae tribe. The number of genome sequences from rhizobial strains available in public databases is constantly increasing, although complete, fully annotated genome structures from rhizobial genomes are scarce. In this work, we report and analyse the complete genome of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae UPM791. Whole genome sequencing can provide new insights into the genetic features contributing to symbiotically relevant processes such as bacterial adaptation to the rhizosphere, mechanisms for efficient competition with other bacteria, and the ability to establish a complex signalling dialogue with legumes, to enter the root without triggering plant defenses, and, ultimately, to fix nitrogen within the host. Comparison of the complete genome sequences of two strains of R. leguminosarum bv. viciae, 3841 and UPM791, highlights the existence of different symbiotic plasmids and a common core chromosome. Specific genomic traits, such as plasmid content or a distinctive regulation, define differential physiological capabilities of these endosymbionts. Among them, strain UPM791 presents unique adaptations for recycling the hydrogen generated in the nitrogen fixation process.

 

Keywords: Rhizobium leguminosarum, genome, nitrogen fixation, plasmid, symbiosis

Boron deficiency inhibits root growth by controlling meristem activity under cytokinin regulation

Other publications from Group members
Poza-Viejo L., Abreu I., González-García M.P., Allauca P., Bonilla I., Bolaños L., Reguera M.
Plant Sci. 2018 May;270:176-189. doi: 10.1016/j.plantsci.2018.02.005. Epub 2018 Feb 8.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Significant advances have been made in the last years trying to identify regulatory pathways that control plant responses to boron (B) deficiency. Still, there is a lack of a deep understanding of how they act regulating growth and development under B limiting conditions. Here, we analyzed the impact of B deficit on cell division leading to root apical meristem (RAM) disorganization. Our results reveal that inhibition of cell proliferation under the regulatory control of cytokinins (CKs) is an early event contributing to root growth arrest under B deficiency. An early recovery of QC46:GUS expression after transferring B-deficient seedlings to control conditions revealed a role of B in the maintenance of QC identity whose loss under deficiency occurred at later stages of the stress. Additionally, the D-type cyclinCYCD3 overexpressor and triple mutant cycd3;1-3 were used to evaluate the effect on mitosis inhibition at the G1-S boundary. Overall, this study supports the hypothesis that meristem activity is inhibited by B deficiency at early stages of the stress as it does cell elongation. Likewise, distinct regulatory mechanisms seem to take place depending on the severity of the stress. The results presented here are key to better understand early signaling responses under B deficiency.

 

Keywords: Boron deficiency; Cell division; Cytokinins; Growth; Quiescent Center (QC); Root Apical Meristem (RAM); Root development

An Iron-Activated Citrate Transporter, MtMATE67, Is Required for Symbiotic Nitrogen Fixation

Journal paper
Kryvoruchko I.S., Routray P., Sinharoy S., Torres-Jerez I., Tejada-Jiménez M., Finney L.A., Nakashima J., Pislariu C.I., Benedito V.A., González-Guerrero M., Roberts D.M., Udvardi M.K.
Plant Physiol. 2018 Mar;176(3):2315-2329. doi: 10.1104/pp.17.01538. Epub 2017 Dec 28.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Iron is an essential micronutrient for symbiotic nitrogen fixation in legume nodules, where it is required for the activity of bacterial nitrogenase, plant leghemoglobin, respiratory oxidases and other iron-proteins in both organisms. Iron solubility and transport within and between plant tissues is facilitated by organic chelators, such as nicotianamine and citrate. We have characterized a nodule-specific citrate transporter of the multidrug and toxic compound extrusion family, MtMATE67 of Medicago truncatula. The MtMATE67 gene was induced early during nodule development and expressed primarily in the invasion zone of mature nodules. The MtMATE67 protein was localized to the plasma membrane of nodule cells, and also the symbiosome membrane surrounding bacteroids in infected cells. In oocytes, MtMATE67 transported citrate out of cells in an iron-activated manner. Loss of MtMATE67 gene function resulted in accumulation of iron in the apoplasm of nodule cells and a substantial decrease in symbiotic nitrogen fixation and plant growth. Taken together, the results point to a primary role of MtMATE67 in citrate efflux from nodule cells in response to an iron signal. This efflux is necessary to ensure Fe(III) solubility and mobility in the apoplasm and uptake into nodule cells. Likewise, MtMATE67-mediated citrate transport into the symbiosome space would increase the solubility and availability of Fe(III) for rhizobial bacteroids.

 

Keywords: medicago truncatula, metal transport, symbiotic nitrogen fixation

A Phenotyping Method of Giant Cells from Root-Knot Nematode Feeding Sites by Confocal Microscopy Highlights a Role for CHITINASE-LIKE 1 in Arabidopsis

Other publications from Group members
Cabrera J., Olmo R., Ruiz-Ferrer V., Abreu I., Hermans C., Martinez-Argudo I., Fenoll C., Escobar C.
Int J Mol Sci. 2018 Feb 1;19(2). pii: E429. doi: 10.3390/ijms19020429.
Publication year: 2018

Abstract


Most effective nematicides for the control of root-knot nematodes are banned, which demands a better understanding of the plant-nematode interaction. Understanding how gene expression in the nematode-feeding sites relates to morphological features may assist a better characterization of the interaction. However, nematode-induced galls resulting from cell-proliferation and hypertrophy hinders such observation, which would require tissue sectioning or clearing. We demonstrate that a method based on the green auto-fluorescence produced by glutaraldehyde and the tissue-clearing properties of benzyl-alcohol/benzyl-benzoate preserves the structure of the nematode-feeding sites and the plant-nematode interface with unprecedented resolution quality. This allowed us to obtain detailed measurements of the giant cells’ area in an Arabidopsis line overexpressing CHITINASE-LIKE-1(CTL1) from optical sections by confocal microscopy, assigning a role for CTL1 and adding essential data to the scarce information of the role of gene repression in giant cells. Furthermore, subcellular structures and features of the nematodes body and tissues from thick organs formed after different biotic interactions, i.e., galls, syncytia, and nodules, were clearly distinguished without embedding or sectioning in different plant species (Arabidopsis, cucumber or Medicago). The combination of this method with molecular studies will be valuable for a better understanding of the plant-biotic interactions.

 

Keywords: BABB, clearing, confocal microscopy, CTL1, giant cells, Meloidogyne spp., nodules, syncytia

Medicago truncatula Zinc-Iron Permease6 provides zinc to rhizobia-infected nodule cells

Journal paper
Abreu I., Saez A., Castro-Rodríguez R., Escudero V., Rodríguez-Haas B., Senovilla M., Laure C., Grolimund D., Tejada-Jiménez M., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
Plant Cell Environ. 2017 Nov;40(11):2706-2719.
Publication year: 2017

Abstract


In collaboration with Dr. C. Larue (CNRS), Dr. J. Imperial (CSIC), and Dr. D. Grolimund (SLS), the lab has recently published the characterization of MtZIP6 role in symbiotic nitrogen fixation in Plant Cell & Environment. This transporter is responsible for introducing Zn into rhizobia-infected cells.

Zinc is a micronutrient required for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. It has been proposed that in model legume Medicago truncatula, zinc is delivered in a similar fashion as iron, i.e. by the root vasculature into the nodule and released in the infection/differentiation zone. There, zinc transporters must introduce this element into rhizobia-infected cells to metallate the apoproteins that use zinc as a cofactor. MtZIP6(Medtr4g083570) is a M. truncatula Zinc-Iron Permease (ZIP) that is expressed only in roots and nodules, with the highest expression levels in the infection/differentiation zone. Immunolocalization studies indicate that it is located in the plasma membrane of rhizobia-infected cells in the nodule. Down-regulating MtZIP6 expression levels with RNAi does not result in any strong phenotype when plants are being watered with mineral nitrogen. However, these silenced plants displayed severe growth defects when they depended on nitrogen fixed by their nodules, as a consequence of the loss of 80% of their nitrogenase activity. The reduction of this activity was not the result of iron not reaching the nodule, but an indirect effect of zinc being retained in the infection/differentiation zone and not reaching the cytosol of rhizobia-infected cells. These data are consistent with a model in which MtZIP6 would be responsible for zinc uptake by rhizobia-infected nodule cells in the infection/differentiation zone.

 

Keywords: zinc-iron permease, nodule, symbiotic nitrogen fixation

Please note that you still may get the preprinted document at BioRxiv.

Medicago truncatula Molybdate Transporter type 1 (MtMOT1.3) is a plasma membrane molybdenum transporter required for nitrogenase activity in root nodules under molybdenum deficiency

Journal paper
Tejada-Jiménez M., Gil-Díez P., León-Mediavilla J., Wen J., Mysore K., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
New Phytol. 2017 Dec;216(4):1223-1235. doi: 10.1111/nph.14739. Epub 2017 Aug 14.
Publication year: 2017

Abstract


Molybdenum, as a component of the iron-molybdenum cofactor of nitrogenase, is essential for symbiotic nitrogen fixation. This nutrient has to be provided by the host plant through molybdate transporters. Members of the molybdate transporters family MOT1 were identified in the model legume Medicago truncatula and their expression in nodules determined. Yeast toxicity assays, confocal microscopy, and phenotypical characterization of a Tnt1 insertional mutant line were carried out in the one M. truncatula MOT1 family member expressed specifically in nodules. Among the five MOT1 members present in M. truncatula genome, MtMOT1.3 is the only one uniquely expressed in nodules. MtMOT1.3 shows molybdate transport capabilities when expressed in yeast. Immunolocalization studies revealed that MtMOT1.3 is located in the plasma membrane of nodule cells. A mot1.3-1 knockout mutant showed an impaired growth concomitant with a reduction in nitrogenase activity. This phenotype was rescued by increasing molybdate concentrations in the nutritive solution, or upon addition of an assimilable nitrogen source. Furthermore, mot1.3-1 plants transformed with a functional copy of MtMOT1.3 showed a wild type-like phenotype. These data are consistent with a model in which MtMOT1.3 would be responsible for introducing molybdate into nodule cells, which will be later used to synthesize functional nitrogenase.

 

Keywords: medicago truncatula, metal transport, molybdate transport, nitrogenase, symbiotic nitrogen fixation

Please note that you still may get the preprinted document at BioRxiv.

Unlocking the bacterial and fungal communities assemblages of sugarcane microbiome

Journal paper
de Souza R.S.C., Okura V. K., Armanhi J. S. L., Jorrín B., Lozano N., da Silva M.J., González-Guerrero M., de Araújo L. M., Verza N.C., Bagheri H.C., Imperial J., Arruda P.
Scientific Reports 2016 6: 28774
Publication year: 2016

Abstract


Plant microbiome and its manipulation herald a new era for plant biotechnology with the potential to benefit sustainable crop production. However, studies evaluating the diversity, structure and impact of the microbiota in economic important crops are still rare. Here we describe a comprehensive inventory of the structure and assemblage of the bacterial and fungal communities associated with sugarcane. Our analysis identified 23,811 bacterial OTUs and an unexpected 11,727 fungal OTUs inhabiting the endophytic and exophytic compartments of roots, shoots, and leaves. These communities originate primarily from native soil around plants and colonize plant organs in distinct patterns. The sample type is the primary driver of fungal community assemblage, and the organ compartment plays a major role in bacterial community assemblage. We identified core bacterial and fungal communities composed of less than 20% of the total microbial richness but accounting for over 90% of the total microbial relative abundance. The roots showed 89 core bacterial families, 19 of which accounted for 44% of the total relative abundance. Stalks are dominated by groups of yeasts that represent over 12% of total relative abundance. The core microbiome described here comprise groups whose biological role underlies important traits in plant growth and fermentative processes.

 

Keywords: metagenomics, microbiome

Transition metal transport in plants and associated endosymbionts: Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and rhizobia

Journal paper
González-Guerrero M, Escudero V, Saez A, Tejada-Jiménez M.
Front Plant Sci. 2016 Jul 29;7:1088.
Publication year: 2016

Abstract


Transition metals such as iron, copper, zinc, or molybdenum are essential nutrients for plants. These elements are involved in almost every biological process, including photosynthesis, tolerance to biotic and abiotic stress, or symbiotic nitrogen fixation. However, plants often grow in soils with limiting metallic oligonutrient bioavailability. Consequently, to ensure the proper metal levels, plants have developed a complex metal uptake and distribution system, that not only involves the plant itself, but also its associated microorganisms. These microorganisms can simply increase metal solubility in soils and making them more accessible to the host plant, as well as induce the plant metal deficiency response, or directly deliver transition elements to cortical cells. Other, instead of providing metals, can act as metal sinks, such as endosymbiotic rhizobia in legume nodules that requires relatively large amounts to carry out nitrogen fixation. In this review, we propose to do an overview of metal transport mechanisms in the plant–microbe system, emphasizing the role of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and endosymbiotic rhizobia.

 

Keywords: metal homeostasis, plant–microbe interaction, arbuscular mycorrhiza, rhizobia, transition metals

Medicago truncatula Natural Resistance-Associated Macrophage Protein1 Is Required for Iron Uptake by Rhizobia-Infected Nodule Cells

Journal paper
Tejada-Jiménez M., Castro-Rodríguez R., Kryvoruchko I., Lucas M.M., Udvardi M., Imperial J., González-Guerrero M.
Plant Physiology 2015 May;168(1):258-72. Epub 2015 Mar 27.
Publication year: 2015

Abstract


Iron is critical for symbiotic nitrogen fixation as a key component of multiple ferroproteins involved in this biological process. In the model legume Medicago truncatula, iron is delivered by the vasculature to the infection/maturation zone (zone II) of the nodule where it is released to the apoplast. From there, plasma membrane iron transporters move it into rhizobia-containing cells, where iron is used as the cofactor of multiple plant and rhizobial proteins, e.g. plant leghemoglobin and bacterial nitrogenase. MtNramp1 (Medtr3g088460) is the M. truncatula Nramp family member with the highest expression levels in roots and nodules. Immunolocalization studies indicate that MtNramp1 is mainly targeted to the plasma membrane. A loss-of-function nramp1 mutant exhibited reduced growth compared to the wild type under symbiotic conditions, but not when fertilized with mineral nitrogen. Nitrogenase activity was low in the mutant, whereas exogenous iron and expression of wild-type MtNramp1 in mutant nodules increased nitrogen fixation to normal levels. These data are consistent with a model in which MtNramp1 is the main transporter responsible for apoplastic iron uptake by rhizobia-infected cells in zone II.